BANTER BLENDER #87: All About Vine with Guest Darius Benson

This week on “The Banter Blender,” Vine superstar Darius Benson (twitter.com/mrlegendarius) joins Ben Mandelker (twitter.com/bsideblog) to talk about Vine. Darius breaks it all down: from his humble beginnings to his big successes and everything in between. He also talks about how he creates his Vines, how his popularity has affected his life, and how he came up with his famous catchphrase. Cool stuff from a funny guy!

Come listen!

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2 thoughts on “BANTER BLENDER #87: All About Vine with Guest Darius Benson

  1. great episode – I like the quick and informative pace

    In a prior episode you noted the bifurcated nature of communication on twitter and it made it me think about about twitter and the nature of web based communication. I have two thoughts, first the limited space on twitter and vine may have caused us to begin to communication with each other in developmentally inappropriate ways. 6 seconds or 140 characters leaves no room for nuance, so people misunderstand irony and humor in the ways that small children often do not understand abstract language. Second, people are forced into a single side on every issue from the ending of HIMYM to Syria, and then we associate their opinion with their personality, as if not liking HIMYM means something about how you feel about relationships. Also, because people opine on everything there is no differentiation between important opinions such as how people feel about foreign policy and unimportant issues such as how people feel about Gaga. Finally, I think that the media confuses twitter with public opinion, 75% of people on twitter never tweet according to their own data, therefore the opinions that get tweeted and retweeted are the most extreme because it is a social media platform and people tend to gravitate toward extreme opinions. However, in reality, most people liked the Lost finale, most people don’t remember the last gaffe that some celebrity made while talking to paparazzi, and most people aren’t outraged by a nip slip. In conclusion, I think that our culture is very sophisticated but technology has not yet found a means of communication amongst people to reflect it; with the exception of podcasts that allow anyone a platform to discuss their ideas and beliefs in detail.

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