ADVENTURES IN DOMESTICITY: Spiced Chickpeas and Fresh Vegetable Salad Edition

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It’s been a hot minute since I’ve served up an Adventure in Domesticity, but fear not: I have been cooking my arse off the past few months. I have a full-on backlog of recipes to share, and I’m getting back into the groove with this healthy ditty from Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s amazing cookbook, Jerusalem: The Cookbook. The recipe I speak of is Spiced Chickpeas and Fresh Vegetable Salad, a hearty and healthy vegetarian option that makes great use of summer veggies such as heirloom tomatoes (which conveniently I used).

Check out the results after the jump…

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ADVENTURES IN DOMESTICITY: ‘Jerusalem’ Shakshuka Edition + Bonus Pics of Other Stuff

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Back in November, a serious obsession began for me in the form of Jerusalem: The Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi. This glorious tome arrived in the mail one morning, and I’ve been more or less cooking from it ever since. How much do I love this book? Let’s put it this way: Jerusalem landed on my doorstep the same day as Ina Garten’s Foolproof, and after nearly three months, I still haven’t touched Ina’s book. Clearly, this is a serious situation.

In the past several weeks, I’ve made plenty of amazing dishes from Jerusalem, but I’ve failed to document them on this here blog because — like my photocaps — I simply haven’t had the time. Well, people, yesterday I turned in a draft of a project I’m working on, which means I can don my blogger cap once again (at least for the time being). I haven’t penned an Adventure In Domesticity in forever; so I thought why not take pics of my latest foray into Jerusalem and share this exciting culinary journey to THE LEVANT?

To celebrate this most Israeli experience, I decided to make shakshuka, which is apparently a very common egg dish in Israel (although, it’s origins are from Tunisia… so think about THAT). There are many recipes for shakshuka out there (including a variation in Ottolenghi’s other cookbook, Plenty), but this is the one I will basing all the others on because a) it was my first, and b) it turned out so so so well.

After the jump, check out pics of the shakshuka process as well as some of the other dishes I’ve made over the past few months, including a nifty dinner party that my friends and I put together…

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